Sep. 13th, 2012

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Ого!!!! Гроза и ливень!
kavery: (SPb)
Ого!!!! Гроза и ливень!
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Photobucket

Carlton Alfred Smith (1853-1946)-A young woman and her cat
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Photobucket

Carlton Alfred Smith (1853-1946)-A young woman and her cat
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Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen  attributed  1593-1661  -  Portrait of a lady said to be Lady Margaret Mennes

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Крупнее

Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen  attributed  1593-1661  -  Portrait of a lady said to be Lady Margaret Mennes

Фрагмент  )

kavery: (animals photo)




Red squirrel taking an adopted baby from nest. (Photo/Ryan W. Taylor)


Фрагмент статьи:

That’s why it might come as a surprise that they practice a typically human behavior – they adopt. And they adopt outside their social group. A new study by researchers at the University of Alberta determined that red squirrels will take in abandoned or otherwise parent-less young and raise them as their own, a seemingly altruistic act. The behavior turns out not to be as charitable as it sounds – the squirrels do get a survival perk. But the discovery is nonetheless an unusual one in the animal kingdom, with its own squirrely flare to boot.

Jamieson Gorrell, a Ph.D. student in evolutionary biology at the University of Alberta and lead of the study, was observing a population of Yukon red squirrels and noticed a lone female had taken a baby from an abandoned nest to raise as her own. When Gorrell sifted through 20 years of red squirrel research from the area, he found four other instances of the same behavior. Not only that, but in each account, the baby adopted was a relative. 
Источник 

kavery: (animals photo)




Red squirrel taking an adopted baby from nest. (Photo/Ryan W. Taylor)


Фрагмент статьи:

That’s why it might come as a surprise that they practice a typically human behavior – they adopt. And they adopt outside their social group. A new study by researchers at the University of Alberta determined that red squirrels will take in abandoned or otherwise parent-less young and raise them as their own, a seemingly altruistic act. The behavior turns out not to be as charitable as it sounds – the squirrels do get a survival perk. But the discovery is nonetheless an unusual one in the animal kingdom, with its own squirrely flare to boot.

Jamieson Gorrell, a Ph.D. student in evolutionary biology at the University of Alberta and lead of the study, was observing a population of Yukon red squirrels and noticed a lone female had taken a baby from an abandoned nest to raise as her own. When Gorrell sifted through 20 years of red squirrel research from the area, he found four other instances of the same behavior. Not only that, but in each account, the baby adopted was a relative. 
Источник 

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